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Asma Khalid

Asma Khalid is a political correspondent for NPR who co-hosts The NPR Politics Podcast.

These days, she's covering the 2020 presidential campaign.

Asma's also reported on the 2014, 2016 and 2018 elections. In 2016, she focused on the intersection of demographics and politics and was awarded the Missouri Honor Medal for her coverage.

Before joining NPR's political team, Asma helped launch a new initiative for Boston's NPR station WBUR where she reported on biz/tech/and the future of work.

She's reported on a range of stories over the years — including the Boston Marathon bombings and the trial of James "Whitey" Bulger.

Asma got her start in journalism in her home state of Indiana (go Hoosiers!) but she fell in love with radio through an internship at BBC Newshour in London during grad school.

John Farner considers himself a lifelong Republican. He worked on George W. Bush's 2000 campaign and then took a job in the administration's Commerce Department.

But Farner was skeptical when he saw Donald Trump step onto the GOP stage. And in 2016, he chose not to vote for any presidential candidate.

This November is different, Farner said. The past 3 1/2 years have made it clear that he needs to pick a side, that it's no longer sufficient to simply abstain.

One of a series of reports looking at Joe Biden's potential running mates


Many progressives are loudly calling for Joe Biden to pick Elizabeth Warren as his running mate. They insist the liberal senator, who's long been a darling of the left, would help the presumptive Democratic nominee win over skeptical young voters.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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On a recent morning, Kim Gates helped hand out free boxes of fresh fruits and vegetables in an underserved area of Grand Rapids, Mich.

Lately, the retired schoolteacher from the nearby tiny town of Caledonia has been trying to volunteer with minority communities and read more about racism.

The 63-year-old white woman had always voted for the candidate she thought was best for the job — like, for instance, Michigan's recent Republican governor, Rick Snyder. She said she never considered herself political until Donald Trump's victory in 2016.

In late April, more than 200 black women who are leaders and activists within the Democratic party signed an open letter to the presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden calling on him to select a black woman as his running mate.

"It is a fact that the road to the White House is powered by Black women and Black women are the key to a Democratic victory in 2020," they wrote.

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